Torn Plantar Fascia and Its Treatment

Q: I tore my plantar fascia ligament back in November while playing soccer. After lots and lots of icing it wasn’t healing. I could hear cracking sounds every time I took a step. I decided to see a podiatrist who told me that I had a torn ligament and a fracture. So I needed a surgery (fusion) because my ligaments were completely damaged. After 8 weeks in a cast, walking boots and therapy, I was told that I would be back to full sports activities after 5 months, and it has been 8 months since then and I am still in pain. I feel that the surgery worsened my injury because my pain is worse than before. Every time I go to see the podiatrist who performed the surgery he keeps telling that “it will get better” or ” we can redo the surgery and add another screw”. He also suggested that I get a ”bone stimulator”. So my question is what is the usual time line for this kind of surgery? Should I see another podiatrist, or should I just wait and keep icing it and crossing my fingers that it will heal before August 15 (first day of my season). Please help me.
-By Assami Valian

Reply:

Plantar fascia takes around 7 to 12 weeks for healing.

It would be better to be objective in assessing the recovery of your trauma. Your X-ray of foot before and after the surgery need to be compared. Structural problems, if any, would clearly show up in the X-ray itself.

Redoing the operations are not desirable. Bone stimulators may be used.

Tears of the planter fascia are slow to heal. There is a big role of exercises (or physiotherapy) after such operations. The fascia contracts or shortened after surgeries. This makes it difficult and painful for the patient to carry out his activities.

Gradual stretching exercises helps in regaining back its original length and range of movements possible there.

Healing Planter Fascia

It is important to avoid all activities and movements that give you pain.

Healing requires rest. Take adequate rest and a good diet, containing plenty of fruits, vegetables and milk.

Gradually stretch your foot. Also, stretch your calf muscles, move each toe.

Take Care,

Buddy M.D.